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The Berkeley Beacon

Emerson, cancel in-person classes immediately

This week feels like a much-anticipated moment is finally upon us. Emerson went almost three months without seeing a significant uptick in COVID-19 cases. For so long, it felt like we might actually make it through the semester—at least until

How I managed my ADHD diagnosis during COVID-19

Back in March, it was easy to chalk up the changes in my mental state and my struggles with online classes to the fact that every CNN notification felt like it came straight out of Stephen King’s The Stand. Following

Take a moment and appreciate the DH food

Why are the doors to the dining hall so heavy? My noodle arms absolutely cannot handle so much weight. Why does it always smell so funky in the dining hall? Where is the normal food? Talking through a mask is

Even now, the work is not over

And just like that, President Donald Trump’s reign is over. But the work for equity? For justice? For a better world? Far from done.  Around the world, supporters of President-elect Joe Biden have swept the streets, beaming with joy and

The next step for pandemic-ridden pro sports after election

Embed from Getty Images Saturday became a record-breaking day as Joe Biden defeated incumbent President Donald Trump in the election—the first time a sitting leader only lasted one term since George H.W Bush was just known as George Bush back

Why I am one of the voters that helped Wisconsin go blue

Four years ago, I had just turned seventeen. I was balancing the stress of school at Medford Area Senior High in Wisconsin, a social life, and the mental toll from losing three grandfathers within the year. But all those emotions

Don’t tell athletes to “shut up and dribble”

Embed from Getty Images Basketball superstar LeBron James’ nonprofit voting organization More Than A Vote played an integral role in last week’s election by helping drive the record turnout of Black voters—a move that boosted former Vice President Joe Biden

Biden’s win is defined by his personal losses

On Election Day, before Joe Biden’s final stops on the campaign trail, he paid a stop to Greenville, Delaware. He attended Mass at Saint Joseph on the Brandywine Roman Catholic Church. After the service, he visited his son, Beau, at

Emo Never Dies: The Black Parade keeps marching on

This October, I celebrated the birthday of an emo icon. My Chemical Romance’s third album,  The Black Parade, officially turned 14 years old in October 2020, meaning the album beloved by angsty teenagers everywhere is old enough to be an

As an international student, watching this election sparks fear

Tags related to America have only trended once a while on the Chinese Twitter-like social media platform Weibo since the pandemic began. I remember seeing trending terms like “U.S. COVID-19 cases climb,” “Trump blamed China for coronavirus outbreak,” “Trump tested

Opinion: How will we cope with another Trump win?

My stomach has been in knots all day. I have already gotten into multiple arguments with my family members and peers regarding the presidential election. The sheer thought of another four years of this administration makes me feel as though

Opinion: Will there be mass violence on Election Day?

While I am cautiously optimistic about the outcome of this year’s election, I am not optimistic about the potential fallout. No matter what the results are, a lot of heavily-armed people may be really angry, and anger plus ammunition is

Bring the online push for democracy to the polls

Many people highly anticipate Election Day. Each and every voter sits staring at their TV screen, hoping they did enough for their candidate to win. This election is no different, and it carries even more weight and importance than previous

Make Election Day an academic holiday once and for all

A week from Election Day, the country stands more fractured and divided. With experts anticipating a voter-turnout tsunami and young people already reporting record breaking voting numbers, Americans are nearing a historic election with potentially life-altering implications.  Although many people,

Twenty three hours inside the college’s quarantine residence

I’d give the Paramount Hotel three stars following my brief stay in the college’s on-campus quarantine residence hall.  After showing symptoms of COVID-19 but receiving a negative test last week, I was advised by the college’s Center for Health and

He’s Got Spunk- ‘The Ick’

Temperatures have started to dip below the sixties. The leaves in the Common are fluttering off the trees. The pumpkin spice latte is back. It’s official: fall is here. Yet there is a much more sinister season creeping up on

Waiting weeks for textbooks is unacceptable

In the midst of midterm season, some students are still waiting on one precious class material: their textbooks.  The campus bookstore has seen severe delays this semester—so much so that people have gone weeks or months without getting their hands

We can cancel online orders, not human beings

English poet Alexander Pope, once said “To err is human,” alluding to the fact that all people make mistakes. Some of these mistakes are more serious than others, like knocking over the coffee mug onto your expensive computer or accidentally

Being OK with not feeling OK

As a Latina woman, I’ve always been surrounded by happiness and the mindset that everything is fine. Even my grandma, who fought depression all her life, always put up a positive front. My mom—a single mother—never showed signs of weakness.

When it comes to COVID testing, where’s the accountability?

Since the start of the fall semester, Emerson has taken considerable action to minimize the spread of COVID-19 and prevent outbreaks on campus. Unlike other universities that have reported more than 1,000 student cases, like Pennsylvania State and Arizona State

2020 is not 2016. Here’s why that matters

Donald Trump supporters and Democrats have one similar perception of this year’s election: that it will follow in the steps of 2016.  Though it appears America is heavily divided on almost every important issue on the ballot, there is similar

Navigating the U.S. election season as an international student

“How’s the U.S. election vibe? Who do you think will win? Does any candidate pose policies that hurt China or international students?” I received this list of questions from family and close friends back home during the first presidential debate

My birthday present this year? Stories.

Almost nothing about my 21st birthday will be how I imagined. It won’t take place in a crowded bar. My friends won’t buy me frozen margaritas and toast to another year in the books. I won’t celebrate in a nice

We were never getting the college experience we expected

For those of you who spent too much of your childhood obsessing over Legally Blonde and Beverly Hills, 90210, like me, you probably had an inflated image of what college life would be like when you got here. I imagined

Mail-in voting is still not accessible for everyone

This election season, a vast majority of the American population is likely going to vote by mail. The COVID-19 pandemic has upended just about everything in our American way of life, including the way we vote.  Like anything else, voting

Mail-in voting is easy. Here’s why you should do it.

What does it mean to vote? When anyone casts their ballot in a normal year, they are fulfilling their civic responsibility as an American citizen. But this November, for the first time in a long time, there is a pandemic

My love letter to The Max that is no more

Obviously, a lot has changed on campus because of the pandemic. But what bothers me the most is not the online classes, nor is it the frequent testing, social distancing, or mask-wearing.  What I miss most is The Max. “But

Letter: OneEmerson?

When I see OneEmerson plastered on walls and headlining emails, all I do is think. I think of the students who live through police brutality and racial injustice on a daily basis and it isn’t just some liberal game of

Letter: Ruthanne Madsen, VP of Enrollment, responds to Gina Martin article

The Office of Financial Aid at Emerson College is devoted to providing access to education for all students with financial need. Unfortunately, inaccurate descriptions of individual circumstances and the College’s response to financial aid situations are prevalent—they can misrepresent the committed

Letter: POWER responds to Gina Martin article

As members of Protesting Oppression With Educational Reform (POWER), a group working to advocate for BIPOC students, we have a vested interest in how The Beacon and other predominantly white organizations on campus portray the BIPOC community. We do our

Time to look at the silver lining

In a room full of pessimists, I am the first to say that the world is going to hell. Nowadays, I cannot believe I am alone in that assertion, especially among my Gen Z peers who also attend Emerson College.

Let off-campus students test somewhere else

Testing all Emerson students weekly is both a noble goal and a requirement this year. It’s been widely proven that the most effective way to pin down the coronavirus before it spreads—or shortly after its transmission begins—is through frequent testing

There’s a new opponent this year: COVID-19

Jillian Kay is a middle blocker for the Emerson women’s volleyball team. Kay is a rising sophomore studying broadcast journalism. When COVID-19 cases first surged in March, I had no idea how much the virus would challenge my athletic identity.

We really, really shouldn’t throw parties

By now, you may have heard a joke or two leading up to this semester—something like “off to school for a few good weeks” or “don’t make your room look too nice, since it’ll probably be empty by next month.”

Remote learning is different, but that’s not a bad thing

As Emerson moves forward with its reopening plans for the fall semester, many students have raised concerns about the value of online classes. Is it comparable to the in-person experience, they ask, when teachers only appear through a screen, sometimes

A weekly email is not enough

Throughout the summer, Emerson administration has sent students sporadic emails. In June came the announcement that campus would reopen in late August. A few weeks later, updates on tuition and then dining flooded students’ inboxes. And just recently, administrators proliferated

Letter: What will we do with our fear?

Kim McLarin is a writing, literature, and publishing associate professor and a graduate program director. Dear Emerson Community, These are frightening times. We fear for ourselves, our families and friends, our students and staff and colleagues, the College itself. We

We’re putting faculty and staff in danger

In a world toppled by the COVID-19 pandemic, Emerson administration gave students a choice: return to an altered campus and participate in a mix of in-person and online classes or opt to go fully online. (Another handful, alternatively, chose to

Don’t be the reason someone gets COVID-19

Around this time each year since I officially entered Emerson, I’ve always found myself coming to campus with a certain worry.  As an incoming first-year student two years ago, my biggest concern was if students and faculty thought I was

Difficult conversations are one step toward racial equity

Sophia Speciale is a rising senior studying visual and media arts. Like many young couples these days, my ex-boyfriend and I met on the dating app Bumble. We connected quickly while text messaging and clicked on our first date. We

The U.S. I wanted to study in no longer exists

My boyfriend texted me right after Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced on Monday that international students would need to leave the U.S. if their university transitions to online-only learning this fall. My first thought was, “Maybe this is a

I shouldn’t have to prove my sports knowledge to men

Ever since I first became invested in sports, especially football, I have experienced situations where I wasn’t taken seriously due to my gender. As a young woman, I don’t look like someone who could easily name every Super Bowl champion

Black at Emerson: Confronting racism through social media

Maxx Carr created the Instagram account @blackatemerson, which presents Black students at Emerson with a platform to anonymously discuss the injustices they’ve experienced on campus. Carr is a second-year student majoring in creative writing. I grew up in New York

POC Column: Dear White People

I once had a small, insignificant, ten-minute conversation with my high school friend Kelis that my mind will never let me forget.  One day, Kelis walked into a Georgian Nordstrom to window shop, and a white sales associate approached and

Stop going on mission trips

When I was a sophomore in high school, one of my classmates asked for donations through a GoFundMe link on her Facebook page. When I clicked on the link, I expected her fundraiser to cover the cost of family medical

Letter: A shameful end for Marlboro

T. Hunter Wilson served as a faculty member at Marlboro College for 47 years.  The Marlboro College Board of Trustees is moving toward a shameful end. They have signed a Purchase and Sales agreement with the Democracy Builders Fund that

Safety trumps socialization: stop putting servers at risk

When I am slated to waitress my restaurant’s closing shift, suggesting new appetizers and giving wine recommendations is something I usually look forward to. Dining at a restaurant is meant to be a relaxing night without the responsibility of cooking.

For a more equitable community (and newsroom)

On June 1, as inklings of warm summer air crept in, a massive protest overtook the streets of Boston, just steps from Emerson’s campus. Demonstrators marched to get justice for the countless Black lives lost at the hands of the

Letter: False assumptions

Christopher Stetson Wilson is the administrative associate to the chair of Emerson’s Journalism Department. Wilson is also an Emerson graduate student studying creative writing. Claire Rodenbush’s opinion piece on June 16 (“Emerson should work for a more affordable hybrid experience”),

Emerson should work for a more affordable hybrid experience

Claire Rodenbush is the Student Government Association Executive President for the 2020–21 academic year. Rodenbush is a third-year student studying creative writing.  The following is a message to the Emerson Board of Trustees: You have a moral obligation to significantly

Regaining control during quarantine

I didn’t even notice the heavy blanket that formed on my body at first. I didn’t even notice my depression and anxiety were triggered.  I never thought I would have to leave campus without emotional preparation, I thought I had

Head Over Feels: The story doesn’t end here

I started writing love columns by accident.  One Wednesday during the first semester of my sophomore year, my boyfriend at the time broke up with me at approximately 5:30 p.m. I had a Beacon production meeting at 6 p.m. So,

Right person, wrong time is a myth

Last semester posed an interesting dilemma for my love life. I had just emerged from a serious, long-term relationship in October 2019, and I planned on studying abroad at Kasteel Well the following semester. I approached my dating life very

Letter: Rejecting the idea of us versus them

Kerry Ferrell is an Emerson College class of 2020 graduate. I wholeheartedly reject the idea of an “Us versus Them” mentality at Emerson in regards to the handling of sexual assault on campus. Rather, I see it as “Those Compassionately

Letter: It is Us Versus Them

Claire Rodenbush is a rising junior at Emerson College who was recently elected as SGA’s executive president for the 2020-2021 academic year. My initial reaction to the opinion piece “Us Versus Them” was one of disgust. Telling survivors of sexual

Editorial Board: Claire Rodenbush is the outside change SGA needs

The COVID-19 pandemic has decimated every facet of life at Emerson College, making the Student Government Association’s spring election more important than ever. The actions of the next executive president will determine the course for an organization that has completely

Munchies smoked my eating disorder

After multiple rips from a bong and eating a whole package of cookies, I found myself sprawled on the floor of my freshman year dorm, full. I had just made my way through four episodes of Face/Off and one package

Letter: Amy Tudor responds to Kevin Quigley statements

Amy Tudor is an alum of Marlboro College and affiliated with I Believe In Marlboro College, a group of alumni and community members opposing Emerson College’s acquisition of Marlboro College.  In a March 19 Berkeley Beacon article, Emerson-Marlboro merger still

Maintaining normalcy in spite of drastic changes

Recently, my dad told me on the phone that after 70 days of home quarantine, he was finally able to go out following China’s ease on their lockdown. I almost screamed when hearing this good news. COVID-19 had forced him

The Berkeley Beacon shuts down after 73 years

We are pained to announce that The Berkeley Beacon, the college’s only student newspaper, plans to shutter operations effective Wednesday at 10  p.m. after more than 73 years of serving the Emerson community.  After necessary funding was denied, we concluded

Seniors are robbed of a milestone by not walking in person

In an email to the Class of 2020, President M. Lee Pelton announced that Commencement on May 9 and 10 will be postponed.  “No doubt, this news comes to you already anticipated,” he said. Maybe I’m an unwavering optimist, but

How student journalism saved me during the COVID-19 crisis

On Friday, March 13, Emerson College announced it would close its residence halls, effectively kicking us all out of our dorms. Across campus, students cried, raided The Max, and frantically texted their parents. Only the night before, in 172 Tremont,

Letter: Covid-19 Tuition Refunds

Abigail Semple is the Student Government Association’s executive treasurer for the 2019-2020 academic year.  I wish this wasn’t happening. I wish I could finish my senior year on campus, I wish I could have all the traditions that the graduating

Continuing campus news coverage amid a global pandemic

It’s been a hectic week, to say the least. There are 197 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Massachusetts as of Monday, according to public health officials. The college made the decision Friday to ask students to leave residence halls at

Letter from the Editor: The world is changing

The view from the third floor of 172 Tremont St. may not look different from only a week ago but the tone and anxiety permeating Boston is tangible.  Excuse the cliche, but one could cut through the stress and distraught

Letter: Don’t make decisions based on rumors

Abigail Semple is the Student Government Association’s executive treasurer for the 2019-2020 academic year.  Everything right now is hectic. Things are overwhelming and scary. But, we all need to remember to care for ourselves, which means sleeping, eating, washing your

Disruptions caused by COVID-19 pandemic deserve transparency

College officials announced Tuesday that the school will transition to classes online for the rest of the semester due to the global spread of COVID-19. Emerson is among a list of local colleges including Northeastern University, Harvard University, and Suffolk

Solved: The Myth of Reverse Racism

A few weeks ago, I scrolled on my TikTok “For You” page and stumbled across a video of a white girl claiming that every race can be racist.  I stared in shock for a few seconds before reading the comment

Good customer etiquette empowers the service industry

The quote “put yourself in someone else’s shoes” takes a hard look at empathy. Whenever I see a “Masshole” driving in Boston, I just remember my mom telling me, “they probably just really need to poop.” While I chuckle on

Strapped for Cash: The financial aid system is broken

Every year when October rolls around, I dread filling out the application for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, commonly known as the FAFSA.  It takes me weeks to complete over 100 questions while I walk my mom through

Letter: Secrecy at Marlboro College

Rebecca Boyden is a former resident of Marlboro whose father was a teacher, Dean, Trustee and Acting President at Marlboro College for over 30 years I am profoundly disturbed by the levels of secrecy which are now accepted at Marlboro

Letter: Elections Shenanigans unacceptable

Brad Dye graduated from Emerson College in 2006 and served as the Student Government Association’s elections commissioner for three years.  As the person who served as SGA Elections Commissioner for three years, and oversaw the College’s transition from paper balloting

Prioritize student safety amid COVID-19 concerns

Kasteel Well officials announced on Feb. 24 that they canceled their planned four-day mandatory academic excursion to Milan, Italy, and barred students from traveling outside the Netherlands until March 15 out of concern for the recent spread of COVID-19 in

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