Fifteen movies that COVID took from us by postponing their release

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Photo: Courtesy of Getty Images

Still from ‘A Quiet Place: Part II’.

By Mariyam Quaisar, Living Arts Editor

The coronavirus pandemic delayed more than 100 movies from being released in theaters in the past year, and pushed several straight to streaming platforms. As a result of the numerous film postponements, we haven’t been able to feel excited or unamused, or to cry and laugh after finally watching a long-anticipated movie. And, more importantly, we haven’t experienced the thrill of buttery popcorn with a side of blue raspberry slushie in more than a year. 

Here are some of the most notable films that were postponed in 2020: 

1. A Quiet Place Part II

A Quiet Place Part II was set to release on March 8, 2020, but was originally pushed to Sept. 6, 2020, then to April 23, 2021, then to Sept. 17, 2021, and then back up to May 28, 2021. Talk about uncertainty, wow. But these are uncertain times. We’re just going to have to wait longer for this horror sequel starring Emily Blunt and John Krasinski (hubba hubba). 

2. The Batman

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The endlessly-hyped The Batman, starring the beautiful Zoe Kravitz and the gorgeous (former vampire) Robert Pattinson, was set to release on June 25, 2021 and was pushed back to Oct. 1, 2021, and then to March 4, 2022. It looks like we’ll have to wait a bit longer for the highly-anticipated return of Batman to the silver screen.

3. Black Widow

Scarlett Johansson’s new Black Widow film was supposed to premiere on May 11, 2020, then was pushed back to Nov. 6, 2020 and then, you guessed it, to 2021, specifically to May 7. This will mark the end of a nearly two-year hiatus of Marvel Cinematic Universe films, the latest superhero blockbuster the studio released being Spider-Man: Far From Home in July 2019.

4. Cinderella

The absolutely stunning Camila Cabello is starring in the new Cinderella, with the delicious Nicholas Galitzine as her Prince Charming and Idina Menzel as her stepmother. What a beautiful cast, but guess what, we can’t see it until July 16, 2021, even though its original release was planned for Feb. 5, 2021. 

5. Eternals

Marvel is coming out with another new film, Eternals, featuring a new team of immortal aliens who have been secretly living on Earth for thousands of years, and come out of the shadows after the tragic events of Avengers: Endgame. The film was supposed to come out on Nov. 6, 2020, but was moved to Feb. 12, 2021, and then to Nov. 5, 2021. Thanks to the coronavirus, we’re going to have to wait a whole year to see Angelina Jolie play Thena and Richard Madden play Ikaris. 

6. Fast & Furious 9

Vin Diesel and John Cena on screen for three hours, alongside Michelle Rodríguez — what a trio. We would already have the image in our minds, but Fast & Furious 9 won’t come out until June 25, 2021, after being pushed from May 22, 2020 to April 2, 2021 to May 28, 2021. 

7. Last Night in Soho

Last Night in Soho is a new psychological horror film starring the Queen’s Gambit actress, Anya Taylor-Joy. Set to release on Sept. 25, 2020 and then April 23, 2021, it will now come out on Oct. 22, 2021. Oh, and for all the Harry Potter fans: Fred Weasley (James Phelps) does make an appearance in this film. 

8. Malignant

Malignant, another horror film, was set to release on Aug. 14, 2020, and after some uncertainty it is scheduled for Sept. 10, 2021. The film will star English actress Annabelle Wallis, and Jake Abel from Supernatural and the Percy Jackson film series. 

9. Minions: Rise of Gru

I don’t know about you guys, but I would LOVE to know the story of a 12-year-old who wanted to become the world’s greatest supervillain, Unfortunately, I would know the story already if the release of Minions: Rise of Gru hadn’t been pushed back to July 1, 2022 from July 3, 2020 and then July 2, 2021. 

10. Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway

Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway, with James Corden as the voice of Peter Rabbit, was planned to be released on Aug. 7, 2020, and then on Jan. 15, 2021, and once again on April 2, 2021, and now on June 11, 2021. I’m getting tired of listing all these days, and I blame COVID-19. 

11. Run

Starring Sara Paulson and debut actress Kiera Allen, Run didn’t get the chance to be in theaters at all, and instead was released on Hulu on Nov. 20, 2020. Kiera Allen, a new actress and student at Columbia University, didn’t get her first big cinema debut, thanks to the coronavirus. 

12. Soul

Disney’s Soul, a film about a jazz musician who travels to another realm between life and afterlife whilst discovering the power of having a soul, also did not get released in theaters. It was instead released on Disney+ on Dec. 25, 2020, after being pushed from June 19, 2020 to Nov. 20, 2020. 

13. Top Gun: Maverick

When will I get to see Tom Cruise in action again? I was supposed to on June 24, 2020 with the release of Top Gun: Maverick, but then the release was pushed to Dec. 23, 2020, and now finally it’s July 2, 2021. All I want is to see Cruise in a Navy uniform, am I asking for too much?

14. Uncharted

Okay, listen to this cast: Tom Holland, Mark Wahlberg, and Antonio Banderas. Their new movie, Uncharted, based on the video game series, was supposed to release this coming March, but was pushed to Aug. 8, then to July 16, and now will be coming out on Feb. 11, 2022. 

15. West Side Story

I think everyone can agree with me when I say I am pissed that West Side Story was not released on its original date of Dec. 18, 2020. Steven Spielberg is the director, Leonard Bernstein composed the music, and it’s a musical set in 1950s New York City. The original came out in 1961 and the remake is now set to release on Dec. 10, 2021, with Ansel Elgort as Tony and newcomer Rachel Zegler as Maria. 

On behalf of the pandemic, I apologize to you all for these delays and the many, many more not listed. Keep your masks on, stay positive, and test negative. Hopefully, then we can see our favorites on-screen, on time.

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